Streets of Gonder, Ethiopia

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Gonder is in the northwestern part of Ethiopia and best know for it's medieval-like castle. But I found the people in the streets most fascinating.

Okay, we'll start with a couple of images of the famous castle (built in the 1600s, but looking very much like those in Europe built in the middle ages). But what really is outstanding in Gonder is the activity in the streets.

So here we go: welcome to the streets of Gonder. And you will be welcomed.

Welcomed even from the two guys building a house out of mud and straw.

And welcomed by the kids whose life is so different from the folks in developed countries.

But mostly, people are just busy doing their life, so don't have much time to pay attention to a couple of foreigners passing through their world.

Of course, in a country where life is so difficult, people spend almost all of their time working. But in Ethiopia, religion, especially Orthodox Christian, is the way people connect with their God.

A lot of folks hang around religious sites hoping for alms.

And there are lots of holy men walking the streets.

Behind all the beauty and chaos on the streets of Gonder, there's buildings from a time long ago that spell out dignity. I'm not just talking about the old castle. It's the more modern buildings that struck me as beautiful.

Sometimes images come together that can't be explained.

And as a final note, I just want to say that my brother Tim and I tried to go to a music concert at the stadium in Gonder. However, it was cancelled because only three donkeys showed up.

 









About This Place…

"This website is dedicated to the many people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo who have suffered and died."

 

The writer was a journalist, prosecutor, and Canadian soldier who is now trying to help the people who live in the DR Congo.

 

The photographs and the commentary here are solely those of the writer and his pet dog named "Bark." The United Nations and MONUSCO have nothing to do with this website.

Similarly, the township of Puskokum in eastern Tennessee is equally not interested.