Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania

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We haven't got to the crater yet; I just want to share with you some of the beauty on route.

These first three images of Ngorongoro Crater are color enhanced, but the place does really look that magical.

The descent into the 18 by 20 kilometer crater is a touch hair-raising.

But once you're on the crater floor, you can see a great selection of Africa's most famous animals. Why there's a wildebeest and hyena now.

And an ostrich pretending to be a roadrunner.

Even though you've got to stay in your vehicle, you can get pretty close to some of the animals.

Such as this wildebeest.

Or this hyena who had dug herself a hole.

But this pack of hyenas stayed away.

At lunch time many tourists congregate at a small lake. This photo was taken in November, which is low season. I can't say I'd like to tour Ngorongoro during the busy season.

This a view of the lunch spot lake from above.

But easily the most touching and memorable scene at Ngorongoro was watching a group of Cape Buffalo hold a funeral for a slain comrade.

A pride of lions had killed a Cape Buffalo and had been feasting on it for a hour or more. The small herd of buffalo kept their distance for all of that time, then suddenly grouped up as you see them in the photo above. Then they made a charge on the lions and chased them back.

And finally, the herd of Cape Buffalo gathered around their partly eaten friend. The group stayed with their dead comrade for about a half hour, then moved away en group. The lions then went back to their meal. Africa teaches hard lessons.

 









About This Place…

"This website is dedicated to the many people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo who have suffered and died."

 

The writer was a journalist, prosecutor, and Canadian soldier who is now trying to help the people who live in the DR Congo.

 

The photographs and the commentary here are solely those of the writer and his pet dog named "Bark." The United Nations and MONUSCO have nothing to do with this website.

Similarly, the township of Puskokum in eastern Tennessee is equally not interested.