Of Wildebeest and Zebra

 

The great migration of wildebeest is known as the largest movement of any species, or something like that. But what struck me while on the Serengeti and watching these large numbers of animals move together is that it's not just wildebeest, but also zebra who make the trek. In fact, the zebras are often in the lead.

What we're seeing are several different herds moving south and trying to stay alive.

This diagram shows the annual clockwise migration of wildebeest and zebra, as they chase the tasty grasses of the Serengeti.

What we will see here is a herd of wildebeest and zebra saved from an attack by lions. All due to the awareness of the herd's leader, the zebra you see here leading the troops.

The herd followed their leader across the road, but they didn't know there was a pride of lions waiting in the gully just 50 meters or so in front of them.

The Iions had been lounging, but perked up when they sensed food arriving.

But the zebra leader also sensed danger in the air, so stopped his troops.

Then there was a brief conference of the generals followed by a quick retreat by the herd. No lives were lost on that battlefield that day. The zebras clearly earned their stripes.

Following all of that a female lion came our way just to have a look about.

Please note that no photographers were injured during the filming of this piece.

 









About This Place…

"This website is dedicated to the many people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo who have suffered and died."

 

The writer was a journalist, prosecutor, and Canadian soldier who is now trying to help the people who live in the DR Congo.

 

The photographs and the commentary here are solely those of the writer and his pet dog named "Bark." The United Nations and MONUSCO have nothing to do with this website.

Similarly, the township of Puskokum in eastern Tennessee is equally not interested.